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RESEARCH ON MINDFULNESS AND YOGA

specialty

Understanding the population we are working with 

Each day, children are faced with stressful events for which regulation skills are required. Inability to regulate stress jeopardizes social, emotional and cognitive development and increases the risk of social exclusion. Especially for at-risk youth who are growing up in neighborhoods that are characterized by low-income rates, high crime, poverty and parental neglect, research has shown that an inability to cope with stressors can have deleterious effects. Risk of academic failure, school-dropout, internalizing as well as externalizing problems, school bullying, and aggression in response to the exposure of traumatizing events are significantly higher to youth growing up in high-income neighborhoods.

Why Mindfulness and Yoga for Youth at-risk

The field of research on contemplative practices, such as mindfulness and yoga is growing rapidly. Interventions targeting several domains suggest many positive promising effects.

Resiliency and Optimism

 

Executive Functions

self-regulatory capacities, emotion regulation, increased attention, focusing, 

Stress Reduction

buffering effect, emotional arousal, prevention of negative effects of stress

Academic success

Improvement in grades,  better school functioning

Social competence and prosocial behaviors

 

Self-efficacy

RESEARCH DONE WITH HLF

Over the years, we have collaborated with different research institutions, such as the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Penn State University, Loyola University, University of Baltimore. Please click below to find all references to the peer-reviewed publications.

 

Evaluation Outcomes of the Stress Reduction and Mindfulness Curriculum

The evaluation of our Stress Reduction and Mindfulness Curriculum showed that implementing our curriculum into the school-context was attractive to students, teachers and school administrators. Positive effects were observed on problematic behaviors including rumination, intrusive thoughts and emotional arousal. A qualitative assessment with middle school students following our intervention showed experiences in improved impulse control and emotional regulation.

MORE RESEARCH

LITERATURE

Waechter, R. L., & Wekerle, C. (2014). Promoting Resilience Among Maltreated Youth Using Meditation, Yoga, Tai Chi and Qigong: A Scoping Review of the Literature. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10560-014-0356-2

Zenner, C., Herrnleben-Kurz, S., & Walach, H. (2014). Mindfulness-based interventions in schools-A systematic review and meta-analysis. Frontiers in Psychology, 5. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00603

Schonert-Reichl, K. A., & Lawlor, M. S. (2010). The effects of a mindfulness-based education program on pre- and early adolescents’ well-being and social and emotional competence. Mindfulness, 1(3), 137–151. doi:10.1007/s12671-010-0011-8.

Schonert-Reichl, K. A., Oberle, E., Lawlor, M. S., Abbott, D., Thomson, K., Oberlander, T. F., & Diamond, A. (2015). Enhancing cognitive and social-emotional development through a simple-to-administer mindfulness-based school program for elementary school children: a randomized controlled trial. Developmental Psychology, 51(1), 52–66

Zenner, C., Herrnleben-Kurz, S., & Walach, H. (2014). Mindfulness-based interventions in schools—a systematic review and meta-analysis. Frontiers in Psychology, 5.

van de Weijer-Bergsma, E., Langenberg, G., Brandsma, R., Oort, F. J., & Bögels, S. M. (2014). The Effectiveness of a School-Based Mindfulness Training as a Program to Prevent Stress in Elementary School Children. Mindfulness, 5(3), 238–248. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-012-0171-9

Sibinga, E. M. S., Perry-Parrish, C., Thorpe, K., Mika, M. and Ellen, J. M. (2014). A Small Mixed-Method RCT of Mindfulness Instruction for Urban Youth. The Journal of Science and Healing, 10(3), pp. 180–186. doi: 10.1016/j.explore.2014.02.006.

Zoogman, S., Goldberg, S. B., Hoyt, W. T., & Miller, L. (2015). Mindfulness Interventions with Youth: A Meta-Analysis. Mindfulness, 6(2), 290–302. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-013-0260-4

Mendelson, T., Greenberg, M. T., Dariotis, J. K., Gould, L. F., Rhoades, B. L., & Leaf, P. J. (2010). Feasibility and preliminary outcomes of a school-based mindfulness intervention for urban youth. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-010-9418-x

Napoli, M., Krech, P. R., & Holley, L. C. (2005). Mindfulness Training for Elementary School Students. Journal of Applied School Psychology, 21(1), 99–125.

Flook, L., Goldberg, S. B., Pinger, L., & Davidson, R. J. (2015). Promoting prosocial behavior and self-regulatory skills in preschool children through a mindfulness-based kindness curriculum. Developmental Psychology, 51(1), 44–51.

Dariotis, J. K., Cluxton-Keller, F., Mirabal-Beltran, R., Gould, L. F., Greenberg, M. T., & Mendelson, T. (2016). “The Program Affects Me Cause it Gives Away Stress”: Urban Students Qualitative Perspectives on Stress and a School-Based Mindful Yoga Intervention. The Journal of Science and Healing. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.explore.2016.08.002

Dariotis, J. K., Mirabal-Beltran, R., Cluxton-Keller, F., Gould, L. F., Greenberg, M. T., & Mendelson, T. (2016). A Qualitative Evaluation of Student Learning and Skills Use in a School-Based Mindfulness and Yoga Program. Mindfulness, 7(1), 76–89. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-015-0463-y

Mendelson, T., Greenberg, M. T., Dariotis, J. K., Gould, L. F., Rhoades, B. L., & Leaf, P. J. (2010). Feasibility and preliminary outcomes of a school-based mindfulness intervention for urban youth. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-010-9418-x

Metz, S. M., Frank, J. L., Reibel, D., Cantrell, T., Sanders, R., & Broderick, P. C. (2013). The effectiveness of the learning to BREATHE program on adolescent emotion regulation. Research in Human Development, 10(3), 252–272.

Coholic, D. A. (2012). Exploring the feasibility and benefits of arts-based mindfulness-based practices with young people in need: Aiming to improve aspects of self-awareness and resilience. Child & Youth Care Forum, 40(4), 303–317.

DeUrquiza, E. F. (2014). Mindfulness, body scan, narrative, and mentalization in the New York City schools. Children & Schools, 36(2), 125–127.

White, L. S. (2012). Reducing stress in school-age girls through mindful yoga. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 26(1), 45–56. doi:10.1016/ j.pedhc.2011.01.002.

Costello, E., & Lawler, M. (2014). An Exploratory Study of the Effects of Mindfulness on Perceived Levels of Stress among school-children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. The International Journal of Emotional Education, 6(2), 21–39. Retrieved from www.um.edu.mt/cres/ijee

Baijal, S., Jha, A. P., Kiyonaga, A., Singh, R., & Srinivasan, N. (2011). The influence of concentrative meditation training on the development of attention networks during early adolescence. Frontiers in Psychology, 2, 1-9.

Semple, R. J., Lee, J., Rosa, D., & Miller, L. F. (2010). A randomized trial of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for children: promoting mindful attention to enhance social-emotional resiliency in children. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 19(2), 218–229.

Felver, J. C., Frank, J. L., & McEachern, A. D. (2014). Effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility of the soles of the feet mindfulness-based intervention with elementary school students. Mindfulness, 5(5), 589–597.

Klatt, M., Harpster, K., Browne, E., White, S., & Case-Smith, J. (2013). Feasibility and preliminary outcomes for move-into-learning: an arts-based mindfulness classroom intervention. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 8(3), 233–241.

Zenner, C., Herrnleben-Kurz, S., & Walach, H. (2014). Mindfulness-based interventions in schools-A systematic review and meta-analysis. Frontiers in Psychology, 5. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00603

Sibinga, E. M., Kerrigan, D., Stewart, M., Johnson, K., Magyari, T, & Ellen, J. M. (2011). Mindfulness-based stress reduction for urban youth. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 17(3), 213-8. doi:10.1089/acm.2009.0605